A tribute to and a lament for Marshall McLuhan.  Five days a week, Tuesday through Saturday, I present one of McLuhan’s observations and talk about its relevance today.  300 ideas. 300 days.  300 posts.

More news on McLuhan’s centenary!

Marshall McLuhan (July 3, age 98).  No pressure.

“Corinne, they’re still at it.”

“Still at what?”

“Planning for my centenary in 2011.”

“What’s wrong with that?”

“Nothing, I suppose, but …”

“But what?”

“I just hope they don’t screw it up.”

Me (July 3, 2010, age 57).   The McLuhan Centenary Celebration Committee Meeting in June.

The planning for McLuhan’s centenary celebrations in 2011 continues. The McLuhan Centenary Celebration Committee met in Toronto on June 29 and reported that:  Next Fall McLuhan will be featured on Stephen Ilias’s Direct Engagement TV show on C-span and Rogers;  The annual meeting of the Media Ecology Association in 2011 will focus on McLuhan; Don Gilles, Peter Russell, and Ernest Whitaker will hold a McLuhan event at Toronto’s Arts and Letters Club in the Spring of 2011;  Many initiatives have been undertaken on behalf of the McLuhan Program at U. of T. (details as yet unavailable); Planning continues for events which will take place in Berlin, Brussels, Barcelona, Winnipeg, and Edmonton; the next meeting in Toronto will be held on July 20.

Do you want to contribute to the celebration?  Your ideas are welcome.  Help spread the news.

Cordially, Marshall and Me

Reading for this post

Minutes of the June 29 meeting.

Tags: ,

Michael Hinton Saturday, July 3rd, 2010
Permalink Communication, Culture, Vol. 1 10 Comments

10 Comments to More news on McLuhan’s centenary!

  • Alex Kuskis says:

    Hi Michael – I’ve linked to your blog from my own blog titled ‘McLuhan Galaxy’. It’s at http://mcluhangalaxy.wordpress.com/ . Check it out…….Alex

  • Bob Dobbs says:

    Hello Mr. Hinton,

    I was recently made aware of your blog.

    I was McLuhan’s archivist in the late 70’s and organized the McLuhan archives (that are now in Ottawa) for Corinne and Matie in Nov.-Dec. ’81.

    I presently work with Mary McLuhan (twin sister of Teri).

    Thinking about your interest in economics in the 70s, I think your professors would today in retrospect be shocked at the genius and brilliance shown by McLuhan in this op-ed for the New York Times in Sept. ’74:

    http://www.fivebodied.com/viewtopic.php?t=2274

    Have you seen it before?

    Bob Dobbs
    Maui, HI
    808-633-4036

  • Mr.McLuhan says:

    🙁

  • Michael Edmunds says:

    Abe Rotstein was a Prof of Michael Hinton. Abe participated in the Monday Night Seminars as transcribed by Marg Stewart. Abe was later (AM – After McLuhan) involved with the MPCT. So I don’t think he was or would’ve been shocked with the brilliance. There were a some other Political Economy Science (legacy of UT- Innis) types at UT who were also pretty hip to the McLuhan doctrines.

  • Bob Dobbs says:

    Is that all you can come up with, Mr. Hinton?

    Silly come, silly go?

    Then:

    “BLAST the Canadian beaver – apt symbol of our dammed up creativity.” Marshall McLuhan, COUNTERBLAST, 1969, p.66

    Meanwhile, this will make you really sad:

    http://www.fivebodied.com/archives/audio/catalog/Bob_Documents/Essays/McLuhan%20and%20Holeopathic%20Quadrophrenia.htm

    Bob Dobbs

  • Bob Dobbs says:

    I talked to Rotstein and other economists at seminars in the 70s and all I would get was an uncomfortable smirk or outright disbelief that anyone thought McLuhan was relevant to the “dismal science”. Yes, Rotstein was there in the 60s but I’d daresay MM was fashionable enough in that decade for Rotstein to lurk over. For whatever reason (Jim Carey?), Rotstein was embarrassed by MM in the 70s.

    Even Tom Easterbrook didn’t get interested in TAKE TODAY until after MM passed on. Proof that Ieven Innisites couldn’t see the “invisible environment” of the virtual economy.

    I know you weren’t talking about MM with other academics in the 70s, Michael (Edmunds), so you wouldn’t know how ostracised he was. You were still in the throes of being a student of MM.

    That’s how I became McLuhan’s “archivist” because it never occurred to anyone else on the U of T campus to take his 1970’s output seriously let alone gather it up from the libraries of Toronto.

    Articles from journals like RENASCENCE in the 1950s? – “Are you nuts? The guy was a Catholic.”

    Even Miller’s book in 1971 ignored MM’s literary criticism – which was a breakthrough in itself – and MM expressed his genuine shock at such shoddy “journalism” disguised as a critical review.

    Only Don Theall paid any attention to it in his 1971 book and he later regretted that he missed the full dimensions of it.

    My last conversation with Don a week before he passed on was about his first book on MM.

    We can keep our public dialogue about MM on the juvenile level but let’s do our homework secretly.

    Bob Dobbs

  • MichAel Edmunds says:

    Fair enough.
    But despite that you are leaving out the part re: Power.
    Those guys were fighting over carbon paper budgets and enrollments.
    They saw the future was whT it used to be – for themselves

  • “Obviously, it’s unimportant. In the time it takes to get a 1,000 people to agree on anything conditions will have changed. With the conditions changed the conversation will be pointless. They’ll be meeting for the wrong reasons on the wrong questions. Under electronic conditions of high speed change this is inevitable.”

  • Bob Dobbs says:

    Michael,

    Join our free conference call on Monday (7pm EST) and take the opportunity to speak with George Thompson:

    George Thompson worked at Marshall McLuhan’s Centre for Culture and Technology during the years 1965 until its closure following McLuhan’s death in 1981. He came to the Centre following a position at the Royal Ontario Museum where he worked with McLuhan collaborator Harley Parker on innovative museum exhibition design. Mr. Thompson himself was a graduate of the Ontario College of Art in 1951. During his years with the Program as McLuhan’s administrative assistant, he worked directly on the layout and design of McLuhan’s Counterblast as well as a deck of cards with pictures and aphorisms. This card deck was intended to stimulate problem-solving and thinking and was distributed as part of the DEW line publication. He was one of the original members of the Marshall McLuhan Foundation based in Antigonish, Nova Scotia, which was established for the electronic publication of McLuhan’s works. He continues his studies and probes with his many friends. {From contributors to issue #149 of the Antigonish Review.

    Bob Dobbs

    Posted by chrystall at 10:16 PM Email This BlogThis! Share to Twitter Share to Facebook Share to Google Buzz

  • Bob Dobbs says:

    Michael,

    http://mcluhanconference.blogspot.com

    Join our free conference call on Monday (7pm EST) and take the opportunity to speak with George Thompson:

    George Thompson worked at Marshall McLuhan’s Centre for Culture and Technology during the years 1965 until its closure following McLuhan’s death in 1981. He came to the Centre following a position at the Royal Ontario Museum where he worked with McLuhan collaborator Harley Parker on innovative museum exhibition design. Mr. Thompson himself was a graduate of the Ontario College of Art in 1951. During his years with the Program as McLuhan’s administrative assistant, he worked directly on the layout and design of McLuhan’s Counterblast as well as a deck of cards with pictures and aphorisms. This card deck was intended to stimulate problem-solving and thinking and was distributed as part of the DEW line publication. He was one of the original members of the Marshall McLuhan Foundation based in Antigonish, Nova Scotia, which was established for the electronic publication of McLuhan’s works. He continues his studies and probes with his many friends. {From contributors to issue #149 of the Antigonish Review.

    Bob Dobbs

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